Day 11 – The Cool Jacket. (A1, B2, C2)

The Ice-Wash Jacket C2, my new favorite! How was that done? Here are some highlights below! Enjoy! (Remember that all these clothes can be ordered in your size, or, learned how to make yourself. Please contact Alexander@StenMartin.com for more info.)

Here we go! After cutting the fabric I’m starting with sewing the main counter seams.

At all the seam intersections where the fabric layer pile-ups are, I give it a go with the leather hammer before I stitch across it. Just to flatten it somewhat.

Here’s a typical seam intersection flattened, stitched and done. The thing is to get the stitching straight and continuous even though it can be op to 16 layers of fabric at some places. (Here it’s just 10 layers.)

It’s also important to end evenly at the raw “end-edges” of each seam, not transporting the top layers too much out of place compared to the lower layers. You always want to keep the shape in the right places, and not just cut off “excess” fabric at the end.

Here you can see the four-layer counter seams on both right and reversed side. I always try to keep them both as neat and even as I can, since the jacket of course will not be lined at all.

The right side of the half-finished front pocket fundament, before adding yoke and pocket flap.

And here is the reversed side of the half-finished front pocket fundament.

Adding collar and neck-strap (loop).

Making the sleeve vents.

Here’s a close-up of the sleeve vent, before adding the sleeve to the body, closing the sleeve and sideseam in one, and finally adding cuffs and waistband.

If any thread suddenly ends in the middle of a seam, or at planned secured spots where the seam naturally ends, I almost always secure the thread ends by hand, and hide the last bit between fabric layers with the help of a needle.

Three! All done! (Buttonholes will be added later on when I have a bit more time. I’ll keep you posted!)

And here it is, worn in today’s combination! Day 11 of 1.000! Let’s do this! See you tomorrow!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 10 – Fresh ‘n’ fade. (A5, B2, C1)

Some things are fresh ‘n’ white, others fade slowly. The keeping of some things tidy, and the letting-go of other items while enjoying its roughness, has always been fascinating to me. Why do we treasure that some things look older, when we at the same time want other things to look brand new?

These jeans for instance, is already starting to get wrinkles where I bend and turn! And I only used them for six days. Knees is also quit wisible in its shape. I like that! Becase it’s my wearing that’s starting to show. Not an artificial ready-made added thingy – but instead my own history together with the garment. It’s starting to shape itself after my body.

This t-shirt on the other hand is clean-cut and all new. Not even with logos or branding (since I did it myself). I like the neat freshness! But, a little life in it would also be ok. I’m actually looking forward to its first wash, after which most garments gets softer and more breathable – and even more comfortable!

So let’s study the garnets’ changing nature alongside the project’s ongoing wash ‘n’ wear! After all, I’m going to wear each garment 100 times so some change is expected, right? Maybe even in me!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 9 – Mix it up ! (A5, B2, C2)

New items in! Adding the Ice-Wash Denim Jacket and the Basic White T-shirt to the Thousand Days Of Hope And Glory project. I call them C2 and A5.

Both just made, this t-shirt has a relaxed fit, short sleeves an a rather old-school neckline. A kind-of anachronistic look, mixing 1980’s a bit naive clean-cut fresh look (neckline, fresh white, properly made and oversized) with a mid 2010’s deconstructed relaxed feel (narrow shoulders, small sleeves, drape over torso).

The denim jacket is also a mix of decades, honoring the 1980’s distressed denim look, but still made clean-cut, well and properly, and not at all oversized, to echo a more current vibe. (Hand-made buttonholes will be added later when I have a bit of sparetime. As long as it can be worn, right?)

And this is how it ended up! I hope you like it! Now I got even more combination possibilities!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 8 – Where to go? (A4, B2, C1)

One week! One full week +1 day! The project is rolling, starting to have a life of it’s own! But what for? What’s the point of trying harder? And is this project good for anyone anyway?

Who knows? Everyone has their own opinion. But the one basic thing is, that tailoring makes me happy. I love analyzing what clothes do for us, and what garments actually are. The ability to create exactly what you want, and then wear it with comfort, is such a joy! I feel truly blessed to be able to do that. Just a simple fact.

Then again, true, there is hardships involved, of course. But where is that not? We all suffer of incomprehensible situations from time to time, right? But I really do like the journey it is, to overcome difficulties. I like solving problems! Also for others. To evolve together with others. To listen and learn. To be inspired!

So, is that reasons enough? Or should there be a larger political take on it? Or environmental? Well, I’ll let that be up to each and everyone. I’m just doing the thing. And, I probably won’t go anywhere soon! I’ll most certain stick with this project for 992 days more.

But… what to do next? On a more practical level? Go totally classic blue denim? Add a dash of dandyism? Punk it up? Or go classic bespoke suit-up-ish? What do you think? Because… anything is possible! As they say – the sky is the limit!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 7 – Tightening the belt! (A3, B2, C1)

Thought I needed a tightening up! So I made a belt. I call it X1 – where the X will represent accessories in this mathematical design project.

That of course will add numerous of new combination possibilities, but I think we’ll choose to ignore that, and stick to the original plan; 30 garments, in three categories, giving 1.000 style combinations.

How did I make the belt then? Well, I’ll give you some hints here below.

For cutting the belt I use this tool. It’s an absolutely lo-tech practical thingy , but so very useful! And the width of the stripes can be adjusted rather precisely.

Cutting the belt from a very stiff leather quality.

Using an espresso cup as a template for the slightly rounded edges.

Cutting the edge with a normal pair of scissors.

Measuring and marking the length of the belt, and then adding an underlay to be folded in under the buckle. Also marking the additional holes needed for assembling the belt.

Checking the width (or length) of the (belt) loop that’s being included into the belt. It has to cover two layers of belt effortlessly.

Punching holes in the edges of the belt loop.

Stitching the belt loop together.

Punching out the additional holes earlier marked.

Folding in the belt underlay and copying over the two “locking the buckle in” holes onto the other side.

Punching out the copied hole-markings.

Adding rivets, to lock in both the buckle and the loop.

Pressing the rivets in place.

How the locked in buckle and loop looks from the right side…

… and how it looks from the reversed side.

Punching out additional holes at the edge of the belt, for closure.

There! Finished the belt technically. Now it’s time for prepping!

Adding grease on both top and underside for softening and shine, and on the sides for additional smoothness.

Make sure to remove excess grease after it has been resting for a couple of hours.

 

The X1 belt completed. All ready for use!

So what has a belt got to do with tailoring? A lot, I think. I like the idea of making things that add up together. And I like products that fulfill my needs of simplicity, practicality and basic silhouettes.

See you tomorrow! We have 993 more looks and combinations to create! I’m so looking forward to it!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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If you enjoyed this content, feel free to support us by sharing this article, subscribe to one or two of our different platforms with informative content on tailoring and design, or, by just donating a sum. As a small independent company, we’re always greatful for your support!

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