Day 19 – Shirts and deadlines. (A3, B2, C2)

Time is running out. It’s time to make decisions! And work hard.

Chapter 1 – Finishing up!

Closing projects can sometimes be just as difficult as starting them. Actually often just plain hard! It’s not easy to say, this is it! – I’m done. Especially if you are the one making that specific decision.

In tailoring, when you feel that you’re starting to approach the final stitch, it’s actually then it all can becom a bit tricky. At the same time as you have that feeling of soon being ready, there actually are multiple finishing-up things to do, that surprisingly can take hours to get through. All those small “irritating” little details!

But it can also be difficult to let go. You get the feeling that you maybe could have done more. That very feeling can truly be a double-edged sword.

On one side, it keeps you alert! Going through garments thoroughly to look for corrections or mishaps is a good solid and professional routine. But when you start adjusting things that do not need adjusting, you’re on a slippery slope. Time – the hours at hand – can quickly start rushing away uncontrollably.

So make sure you know what your end product should look like, before you start checking the product. Often, a okay is good enough. And especially if you are used to holding a high standard overall.

For me, these were the two shirts I finished up today. Satisfied! Learned a lot. As I always do with each and every product I make. To finish products is an important thing to do, to be able to learn.

Now off to finish up the next two items in the summer 2019 collection – while again using my time weisly. That is, deciding what’s good enough, to still being able to move on.

Chapter 2 – The deadline is closing in. Make a decision!

Today it’s already the 19th day of the Thousand Days Of Hope And Glory project! So that basically tells me that I only have tomorrow, one day, to come up with a solution for keeping the project rolling. A garment. But which one? That decision can be a bit difficult to rush!

Busy as I am right now, I think I can narrow it down to two options. Since I don’t have time to “invent” (create) a compleatly new design, I either make a quick t-shirt – the 6th one – which would give me an additional 4 more days to go on, or, I make a new denim jacket in a different color, which would give me additional 10 days more! But do I have time for making a whole denim jacket? That’s the question!

Do I invest time now, knowing I have other deadlines to reach, to get more elbow room further down the road, or do I make something quicker now, knowing I just pushed the deadline a little tiny bit further in front of me? Work harder now to be awarded later, while walking the thin line, or do the secure and sensible thing now, while still keeping the stressful deadline just in front of me? Getting 10 or 4 days – that’s what I have to decide tomorrow!

One thing is sure though – whichever garment I make, I have to wear it for 100 days. That’s the rule. So it better be comfortable! And hopefully look good too.

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 16 – Teach. Make. Be. (A3, B1, C2)

Chapter 1 – Teach.

Got these images refreshed for me this weekend. It’s from one of my former student’s work – actually it’s a part of his exam project at my academy. His name is Torbjörn Bergström. I think the garments are so beautiful and a perfect example of well cut and crafted tailoring. The inspiration was Art Deco and the model’s name is Mille. The pictures are from around the turn of the century.

Chapter 2 – Make.

Today I was making shirts for the Bespoke Era project. Matching shape and stripes.

I think it’s important to know how to give a garment a certain calmness. And that is often the case when the stripes (or other patterns) match.

It’s not always as easy as it looks, and must be taken into concidiration throughout the whole process, from fabric chosen, while cutting and shaping, and all the way through to the fitting with the customer.

In this case I even mirrored the pattern at the center back to get the pattern to be the same at both left and right.

I think a neat look given to the garment gives lager focus on the owner of the garment, while wearing it. And that’s our trade mark, to give room to personalities! There should not be a battle between owner and garment.

Chapter 3 – Be.

Had my sixteenth combination on today. A3, B1 and C2. Now there’s only 984 to go. The garments gets more and more comfortable for each day worn. Such a great feeling!

I  really do like the idea of teaching, making and wearing (or being!) kept combined. Because then everything you teach will be tested. And the things you learn from producing, can be shared. That’s the way it should be, in my opinion.

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 7 – Tightening the belt! (A3, B2, C1)

Thought I needed a tightening up! So I made a belt. I call it X1 – where the X will represent accessories in this mathematical design project.

That of course will add numerous of new combination possibilities, but I think we’ll choose to ignore that, and stick to the original plan; 30 garments, in three categories, giving 1.000 style combinations.

How did I make the belt then? Well, I’ll give you some hints here below.

For cutting the belt I use this tool. It’s an absolutely lo-tech practical thingy , but so very useful! And the width of the stripes can be adjusted rather precisely.

Cutting the belt from a very stiff leather quality.

Using an espresso cup as a template for the slightly rounded edges.

Cutting the edge with a normal pair of scissors.

Measuring and marking the length of the belt, and then adding an underlay to be folded in under the buckle. Also marking the additional holes needed for assembling the belt.

Checking the width (or length) of the (belt) loop that’s being included into the belt. It has to cover two layers of belt effortlessly.

Punching holes in the edges of the belt loop.

Stitching the belt loop together.

Punching out the additional holes earlier marked.

Folding in the belt underlay and copying over the two “locking the buckle in” holes onto the other side.

Punching out the copied hole-markings.

Adding rivets, to lock in both the buckle and the loop.

Pressing the rivets in place.

How the locked in buckle and loop looks from the right side…

… and how it looks from the reversed side.

Punching out additional holes at the edge of the belt, for closure.

There! Finished the belt technically. Now it’s time for prepping!

Adding grease on both top and underside for softening and shine, and on the sides for additional smoothness.

Make sure to remove excess grease after it has been resting for a couple of hours.

 

The X1 belt completed. All ready for use!

So what has a belt got to do with tailoring? A lot, I think. I like the idea of making things that add up together. And I like products that fulfill my needs of simplicity, practicality and basic silhouettes.

See you tomorrow! We have 993 more looks and combinations to create! I’m so looking forward to it!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 3 – Going deep. (A3, B1, C1)

Today the V-neck version of a black t-shirt was added to our Thousand Days Of Hope And Glory project. It’s item no. 5 and it’s named A3. But the choise of neckline’s style isn’t the only thing to be considered when opting for a personalized fit. Let’s dig deep into some of the things to look at and choose between!

The first obvious things are of course the body’s width and length. And then the neckline-style, and sleeve length. But there’s more to this! Try to see the shape of it’s torso as a 3D silhouette! Then you can decide so much more!

If you look at the sides, you can see a slightly shaping. That’s because I want it tighter over the chest, and looser at waist and hips. But that’s of course up to you. And if you look at the arm-holes, you will notice that they’re very high indeed – that gives a lot of movement, without pulling up the t-shirt every time you raise your arms.

If we continue to neck and shoulders you can detect that the back part is cut much higher than the front part. This is done to prevent a back-sloping neckline with a gaping area at center back (which I just can’t stand to wear) – a very common thing nowadays! Therefore I always (often) shift the shoulder seam and neckline forward in my construction before I cut the fabric.

Here’s a back view wich perfectly shows the “athletic fit” cut, which just means a narrow fit and therefore lot’s of movement. You can also detect how narrow the sleeves are placed on the shoulder seam.

And here seen, a bit more from above.

I also like wide hemming. It gives a softer feel, and a nicer drape. Plus a more stable elasticity there. The width of the sleeve also feels important, to give just the right look and feel over the biceps muscle. Do you want it tight, or loose, or maybe somewhere in between? It’s all up to you.

So here it is! The third combination with a new t-shirt, A3, plus the same denim jeans and jacket as before – B1 and C1 – which now have been worn in three continuous days. The stiff material already now feels so much softer. The big question now, is what t-shirt to wear (and make) tomorrow? Let’s see!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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If you enjoyed this content, feel free to support us by sharing this article, subscribe to one or two of our different platforms with informative content on tailoring and design, or, by just donating a sum. As a small independent company, we’re always greatful for your support!

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