Day 23 – C3 in progress… (A6, B1, C1)

Two days left and I have to hurry! The new jacket needs to get ready for this project’s 25th day. No time to waste!

Here are some progress images of my work today. The jacket is made in the same denim material and stitching color as my B2 Jeans, so I will end up having a compleat set. Here you can also see a clear view of all the counter seams, both from front and behind.

And for today’s combination I’m wearing the A6 T-shirt, B1 jeans, C1 denim jacket, and the X2 belt. All black!

So tomorrow will be the last day before needing another garment. Let’s do this! See you there!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 21 – Welcome A6 ! (A6, B2, C2)

Finally time for a new garment! Made under a slightly pressed timetable, it’s a black version of the white A5 t-shirt with some minor alternations. I like this design – it’s super comfortable!

The style is slightly oversized with cropped but neatly hemmed sleeves. The neckline rib is wide and cut a bit away from the neck. The hemming is wide.

I opted for the quickest solution, that still gives me four more days with different combinations. So soon I need to make a new garment!

This is how the combination looked today! And now this new t-shirt will also be worn for an additional 99 days – a total of 100 – during the 979 days I have left of the project.

The denim jacket is actually just newly washed, by hand. Let’s see how that was done tomorrow! See you there! And have a wonderful day!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 16 – Teach. Make. Be. (A3, B1, C2)

Chapter 1 – Teach.

Got these images refreshed for me this weekend. It’s from one of my former student’s work – actually it’s a part of his exam project at my academy. His name is Torbjörn Bergström. I think the garments are so beautiful and a perfect example of well cut and crafted tailoring. The inspiration was Art Deco and the model’s name is Mille. The pictures are from around the turn of the century.

Chapter 2 – Make.

Today I was making shirts for the Bespoke Era project. Matching shape and stripes.

I think it’s important to know how to give a garment a certain calmness. And that is often the case when the stripes (or other patterns) match.

It’s not always as easy as it looks, and must be taken into concidiration throughout the whole process, from fabric chosen, while cutting and shaping, and all the way through to the fitting with the customer.

In this case I even mirrored the pattern at the center back to get the pattern to be the same at both left and right.

I think a neat look given to the garment gives lager focus on the owner of the garment, while wearing it. And that’s our trade mark, to give room to personalities! There should not be a battle between owner and garment.

Chapter 3 – Be.

Had my sixteenth combination on today. A3, B1 and C2. Now there’s only 984 to go. The garments gets more and more comfortable for each day worn. Such a great feeling!

I  really do like the idea of teaching, making and wearing (or being!) kept combined. Because then everything you teach will be tested. And the things you learn from producing, can be shared. That’s the way it should be, in my opinion.

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 11 – The Cool Jacket. (A1, B2, C2)

The Ice-Wash Jacket C2, my new favorite! How was that done? Here are some highlights below! Enjoy! (Remember that all these clothes can be ordered in your size, or, learned how to make yourself. Please contact Alexander@StenMartin.com for more info.)

Here we go! After cutting the fabric I’m starting with sewing the main counter seams.

At all the seam intersections where the fabric layer pile-ups are, I give it a go with the leather hammer before I stitch across it. Just to flatten it somewhat.

Here’s a typical seam intersection flattened, stitched and done. The thing is to get the stitching straight and continuous even though it can be op to 16 layers of fabric at some places. (Here it’s just 10 layers.)

It’s also important to end evenly at the raw “end-edges” of each seam, not transporting the top layers too much out of place compared to the lower layers. You always want to keep the shape in the right places, and not just cut off “excess” fabric at the end.

Here you can see the four-layer counter seams on both right and reversed side. I always try to keep them both as neat and even as I can, since the jacket of course will not be lined at all.

The right side of the half-finished front pocket fundament, before adding yoke and pocket flap.

And here is the reversed side of the half-finished front pocket fundament.

Adding collar and neck-strap (loop).

Making the sleeve vents.

Here’s a close-up of the sleeve vent, before adding the sleeve to the body, closing the sleeve and sideseam in one, and finally adding cuffs and waistband.

If any thread suddenly ends in the middle of a seam, or at planned secured spots where the seam naturally ends, I almost always secure the thread ends by hand, and hide the last bit between fabric layers with the help of a needle.

Three! All done! (Buttonholes will be added later on when I have a bit more time. I’ll keep you posted!)

And here it is, worn in today’s combination! Day 11 of 1.000! Let’s do this! See you tomorrow!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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Day 10 – Fresh ‘n’ fade. (A5, B2, C1)

Some things are fresh ‘n’ white, others fade slowly. The keeping of some things tidy, and the letting-go of other items while enjoying its roughness, has always been fascinating to me. Why do we treasure that some things look older, when we at the same time want other things to look brand new?

These jeans for instance, is already starting to get wrinkles where I bend and turn! And I only used them for six days. Knees is also quit wisible in its shape. I like that! Becase it’s my wearing that’s starting to show. Not an artificial ready-made added thingy – but instead my own history together with the garment. It’s starting to shape itself after my body.

This t-shirt on the other hand is clean-cut and all new. Not even with logos or branding (since I did it myself). I like the neat freshness! But, a little life in it would also be ok. I’m actually looking forward to its first wash, after which most garments gets softer and more breathable – and even more comfortable!

So let’s study the garnets’ changing nature alongside the project’s ongoing wash ‘n’ wear! After all, I’m going to wear each garment 100 times so some change is expected, right? Maybe even in me!

– Sten Martin / DTTA

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